Friday, September 30th, 2016 11:10 pm

Posted by Mark Pack

Here is the surprising story of how a British Conservative politician played a key role in creating the European Convention on Human Rights:

The animation is inspired by the life and words of David Maxwell Fyfe (1900-1967). Here is some real footage of him at work during the Nuremberg trials:

On April 2, 1946, Sir David Maxwell-Fyfe of the British Delegation cross-examined Von Ribbentrop, the Nazi Germany Foreign Minister. It was deemed one of the most striking cross-examinations of the Trial enhanced by the Aliies having a large number of captured documents. Subjects discussed included the matter of pressure on the Austrian Chancellor Schuschnigg; admissions of the threat of force in Czechoslovakia; treatment of the Yugoslav partisans and relations with Great Britain.

Friday, September 30th, 2016 03:16 pm

Posted by louisamellor

Louisa Mellor Review
Sep 30, 2016

New ITV crime drama The Level efficiently sets up a whodunit mystery grounded in an emotional story…

Friday, September 30th, 2016 10:03 pm

Posted by shinyjenni

Do you have a Doctor Who community or a journal that we are not currently linking to? Leave a note in the comments and we'll add you to the who_daily reading list.

Off LJ News
On This Day... In 1967 The Yeti First Appeared
New image of Peter Capaldi from series 10
The cast of Class on what to expect
Canada's Space channel want your questions for Peter Capaldi and Pearl Mackie

(News via og_news, blogtorwho and tardisscanner among others. For additional news please visit: googledw)

Discussion and Miscellany
louisedennis reviews The Romans

Fanfiction
Completed
Jammie Dodger by kb9vcn (Eleven, Amy, (spoiler))

If you were not linked, and would like to be, contact us in the comments with further information and your link.
Friday, September 30th, 2016 09:00 pm

Posted by Pink Dog

More educative entertainment from Tom Scott:

Inuktitut syllabics are brilliant. A writing system that’s not an alphabet, but something really clever: an abugida, one designed from scratch for a language very unlike anything European.

Friday, September 30th, 2016 08:24 pm

Posted by John Scalzi

It’s our last stack of new books and ARCs for the month of September, and it’s a very fine one, I have to say. What here looks good to you? Tell me in the comments!


Friday, September 30th, 2016 04:00 pm

Hey, do you all remember last year when David Steffen successfully kickstarted the Long List Anthology? He’s doing it again this year, and like last year it’s going to be full of fabulous fiction–including, this year, my novelette “Another Word for World” if the KS makes its novelette stretch goal.

Check it out:


The purpose of the Long List Anthology is to celebrate more of the fiction that was loved by the Hugo Award voting audience. Every year, besides the well-known final ballot, there is a lesser-known longer list of nominated works. The purpose of this anthology is to put a bunch these stories in a package to make them easy for readers to find, so you can put them on your bookshelf or load them up on your e-reader. The goal here is to widen that celebration of great fan-loved fiction.This will be the second volume of the Long List Anthology. Last year’s volume was a huge success, reaching the base goal in a couple days, and the stretch goals for novelettes and novellas not long after, and up into audiobook stretch goals after that. It has sold close to 10,000 copies, appeared in Amazon’s top 100 paid books for a time, and still continues to sell copies steadily almost a year later.

The base funding goal will include the Short Story category only. Stretch goals will expand the anthology to include novelettes , and then novellas.

Ebook copies will be available in EPUB, MOBI, and PDF.

It’s already a fabulous ToC without the stretch goals–we’re talking Ursula Vernon, Amal El-Mohtar, Alyssa Wong, and I could keep going and piling on the awesome. And two of the pieces are letters from the award winning and just generally well received Letters to Tiptree.

With the novelette stretch goal, there’s Rose Lemberg, Elizabeth Bear, Cat Valente, Naomi Kritzer, and Tamsyn Muir. And if the novella stretch goal is met, we’re talking Usman T. Malik and Kai Ashante Wilson.

As I post this, the base goal is very close to being met. But how much more awesome would it be to have the novelettes and the two novellas in there? Pretty awesome, is what I’m thinking.

If this sounds cool to you, and it’s something within your means at the moment, please consider supporting. Personally I think the entire Long List project is an excellent one, and I’m hoping it continues.

Mirrored from Ann Leckie.

Friday, September 30th, 2016 01:18 pm
I said when I started reading the Wimsey books that I was reading them explicitly by way of an obituary for the United Kingdom, for whatever it will be post Brexit is not what it was before, which admittedly has probably put a different spin on these books than many people bring to them, but which for me highlights the fact that Sayers is, by the era of MMA and T9T, cropping the action of the books very carefully, in a way that can't help but draw attention to what's going on outside the frame. I imagine her readers didn't need to be reminded, and frankly as a historian and a person with a heart and a brain in 2016 I don't need a reminder either. But by T9T, even for a book that is isolated and insular, things far outside England are shown to be on everyone's minds: Mussolini and the Showa Emperor are name-checked explicitly, and the much-maligned League of Nations is the subject of a running joke between Wimsey and the nameless sluice-gate keeper.

No more water, but fire next time )
Friday, September 30th, 2016 08:30 pm

When I first started publishing chapters in edited volumes, back when dinosaurs roamed the earth and the text was created on an Amstrad 512, the author got a small - very small - one off payment.

And then it was, authors got a free copy of the hardback.

Then it became a free copy of the paperback.

Then it became a free downloadable pdf of their own chapter.

I have lately been approached re the republication of a themed journal issue as a book: and contributors do not even get a copy. They can buy one at a 30% discount.

Academic publishing, sigh.

***

And on the amount of forgetfulness between feminist generations: Welcome to feminism's new gross out frontier.

One is somewhat surprised to see that:

[T]his type of feminism doesn’t look like the iconic polemics of Shulamith Firestone, Naomi Wolf or Germaine Greer. It does not fit the sociological paradigm of Natasha Walter, Ariel Levy or Laurie Penny, all of whom have tackled a classic 20th century feminist subject – objectification – with political panache. And no, it’s not related either to the brainy fiction of Erica Jong or Marilyn French.

Those dainty cerebral damsels name-checked there were Greer, who advocated tasting one's own menstrual blood, Firestone, who described childbirth as 'like shitting a pumpkin', and Jong, who had a certain amount of bodily-fluid stuff going on in Fear of Flying ('brainy fiction'? WOT. NO.).

No, really, it's more like taking that tradition and going even further with it, rather than a radically new departure.

But why is there this constant looking back at former feminist generations as gentler and genteeler than they were?

Friday, September 30th, 2016 07:41 pm

It’s the nature of the writing beast that no matter what kind of writing you specialise in, someone will tell you that you’re doing it wrong. In the m/m genre they will also find numerous ways of telling you that you are doing it immorally. Either you’re being homophobic by exploiting gay men’s lives for the sake of straight women, or you’re being misogynistic by writing women out of your fictional worlds entirely. Or both at once.

Now I’m not sure how a genre can be simultaneously wrong by catering to women’s needs while also being wrong by being bad for women, but as is so often the way, there may be some truth in both things. So what can be done to minimise the problem? Well, we do what we can to make sure gay people enjoy our writing as much as straight women, and we make sure we have more interesting female characters, so women are well represented in our fiction.

Clearly the main problem in getting female characters into your m/m fiction comes from the fact that both of your main characters are men. Your viewpoints will be overwhelmingly male because your romantic couple are both male. And there’s nothing you can do about that without completely changing the genre to m/f, which rather defeats the object.

So if the nature of m/m means that both your main characters are male, what can you do to increase the presence of interesting female characters?

We could start off with the evil ex. Does main character A have a wife or girlfriend? She doesn’t have to be an evil bitch – after all, it’s no more fun for a woman to be married to a gay man than it is for a gay man to be married to a woman. So any breakup is likely to be both their responsibility. Maybe they separated amicably and are now working at being friends while raising their children together (or apart)? Or maybe she is an antagonist, but for perfectly good reasons, which can be addressed during the plot without blaming her for being some kind of monster.

Maybe the main characters both have evil exes, and they are genuinely moustache-twirling (what’s the female equivalent? Dog-fur-wearing?) villainess exes with plans to rule the world. Everyone loves a magnificent villain. As long as you have a woman or two on the side of the angels too, a genuinely, gloatingly, over the top villainess can be great fun.

JadisLionoutfit

We could also mention mothers. It’s a fair guarantee that every character will have a mother, and she doesn’t need to be dead or out of the picture. She could just as easily be funny and capable, or doing a glamourous or interesting job. She could be interfering, but that doesn’t have to be a bad thing.

Many people have sisters, and your main characters may be among them. Perhaps they have gone into business with their sister, or their sister has a problem they can help with, or their sister has a brilliant idea about what they can do to solve whatever their big plot problem is.

Maybe one or both of your main characters have female bosses? Maybe their bosses are rivals, and that’s how they get together – snooping around each others’ businesses in a series of acts of industrial espionage, and they can’t get together without talking the bosses into a merger instead of a hostile takeover. As long as neither boss is represented as an evil bitch, this could be a great chance to develop two strong female characters with a large degree of power and influence on the plot, who are still neither of them involved in the main relationship.

Along the ‘bosses’ line, your characters might also have female servants, whose below-stairs goings on affect their plotline. No reason why these shouldn’t be fully rounded characters too.

Your characters may work in a team and have female team-mates, whether this is one of a group of paranormal werewolves or werewolf slayers, or floor layers or architects or whatever.

If we’re talking a fantasy setting, ask yourself if your king really needs to be a king? Could she perhaps be a queen instead? If your lead characters are always having to deal with the queen and her (ninja magician) handmaidens, it will make it a great deal harder to end up with a book in which it looks as if you’ve killed off anyone in possession of a cunt.

If you find that, without realising it, you have written a novel in which there are no female characters at all, why not go the Ellen Ripley route, pick one or two of your most important support characters and make them women instead? Generally this makes no real difference to their characteristics or role in the story, and can be easily done. It may even bring some interesting freshness to your novel when the hard drinking, fist fighting, womanising best friend of the hero is a woman herself.

ripley

When I finished my first draft of Foxglove Copse, for example, I thought “this is a bit sparse on female characters! What can I do?” So I changed Jory’s tough farmer uncle John who lives out of town with his ‘close friend’ Phil to a tough farmer auntie Jillian and her ‘close friend’ Phillis. Which was a win all around.

Obviously, all of this is slightly more difficult when you are writing in an all male environment, such as in a historical – aboard a warship, inside a gentleman’s club etc. But usually even in those situations there were women invisibly doing their stuff, whom you can choose to make visible. Servants at the club, wives travelling alongside their menfolk in the warship, a doctor’s daughter serving as loblolly boy rather than being left destitute at home. Look closer at almost any situation and there will be women there, any one of whom might get involved with the plot. And yes, perhaps all she can do is be the washerwoman who scorched the MC’s breeches because he was rude to her, but even that shows there are women in this universe who have their own personalities and are not to be trifled with.

Even the small things can make a difference; the barmaid who offers the hero directions to the castle and grins behind her hand as he goes, the landlady who gets the bloodstains out of the cuffs with a suspicious look, the interior decorator who gets mistaken for a stalker when she tries to break in to replace that lamp…

In short, just because your main characters are both men doesn’t mean you can’t fill your world with interesting women. If you put effort into making your men believable, complex and non stereotypical so as to avoid the danger of offending your gay readers, why not also put effort into including believable, complex, non stereotypical female characters too, so as to avoid the danger of offending your female readers? You might even find you start liking them yourself.

~

LionessFinal133x200

Mirrored from Alex Beecroft - Author of Gay Historical and Fantasy Fiction.

Friday, September 30th, 2016 08:28 pm
We're going off to Belgium tomorrow ("Is it a convention?" asked Mrs Next Door. "No, we're having an actual *holiday*!") for a few days in Bruges and then a few more in Ghent. New sitter, so fingers crossed that she does ok!

Today, I went to the Kent Quilt Show, where I had a couple of small accidents to the tune of £60. Could have been worse: I wasn't buying for anything specific other than some Christmas bits!

Also, would anyone like to own up to sending me the WI's book of Home Made Wines, Syrups and Cordials from 1959? I'm not sure if the lack of a note / return address was deliberate or not, although I am currently looking in an Ilford direction! Whoever it was, thank you and I'll be having a proper look at it when we get back. (Six different recipes for metheglin! Two for hop beer: would that not just be 'beer'?)
Friday, September 30th, 2016 03:02 pm
(bumped up from comments)

Nobody who made Strange Horizons' annual count—still not holding a grudge—has reviewed as many books by POC as I have. That's less a matter of diligence on my part (my total for 2016 will likely only be about 60) than a measure of how low a bar the annual count sets for me in this matter.

Review source POC (%)
James Nicoll Reviews 2015: 45 (14)
JNR 2016: 44 (23)
Strange Horizons: 30 (22
Locus: 22 (7)
Tor: 18 (13)
Lightspeed: 14 (50)
Romantic Times: 14 (10)
Io9: 12 (21)
NYRSF: 11 (26)
SFX: 10 (6)
CSZ: 8 (35)
Interzone 7 (10)
LARB: 7 (20)
F&SF: 5 (9)
Vector: 4 (8)
Asimov's: 3 (6)
Analog: 3 (4)
SFS: 2 (4)
Foundation: 1 (3)
Rising Shadows 1 (1)

Or to put another way, it's pretty easy for a single person to read and review as much spec fic by POC as Rising Shadows, Foundation, Analog, Asimov's, Vector, F&SF, LARB, Interzone, CSZ and SFX did en masse in 2015. The good news is, it would be very, very easy for Rising Shadows, Foundation, SFS, Analog, Asimov's, Vextor, F&SF, SFX, and Locus to improve their numbers in this matter merely by increasing the fraction of books by POC they read from single to low double digit percentages.
Friday, September 30th, 2016 02:26 pm
For those of you who don't sit on dreamwidth's IRC channels, you won't know that I've spent the better part of the last couple of weeks totally rewriting Dreamwidth's Rich Text Editor. That's a large reason for why my updates here crawled to a halt. Sorry about that.

I've hit the point where I think it's done, but I need more feedback on it. It's about to be announced a bit wider, but if you'd like to see the work in progress, here's what you have to do:
  • http://www.wohali.hack.dreamwidth.net/ has the new RTE running on it and is set to open signup. Create an account there.
  • Access http://www.wohali.hack.dreamwidth.net/beta to turn it on and http://www.wohali.hack.dreamwidth.net/update to use it.
  • If needed, accessibility help is available by pressing Alt+0 (zero) while the editor is focused.
  • To completely disable the new RTE, there is a setting under the Settings link on the beta update page. It is labelled "Completely disable the Rich Text Editor (use plain textarea only)" and takes effect immediately.
  • Feedback can be left as a follow-up to this post, to the (soon to be made) dw-dev post, or if demonstrating a specific problem, via link to a post in my 'hack instance with details.
For those who just want to ooh and aah at the interface, here's a (rather large, sorry) picture.
Friday, September 30th, 2016 11:11 am

A while back the artist Robin Scott, a friend of mine, released a project called The Urban Tarot.

Box cover for The Urban Tarot by Robin Scott

I want to talk about how awesome this deck is — and I especially want to address those of you for whom the “tarot” part isn’t much of an attraction, but the “urban” part might be. Let’s start by quoting from Robin’s introduction in the guidebook:

Too often we are told that magic and wisdom belong only to the forgotten forests, the places untouched by human hands, and to ages long lost to memory.

I reject this idea. I look around my world, and I see the beauty, the wonder, the magic in the metropolis, the power under the pavement.

“The metropolis” there isn’t generic. It’s New York City, where Robin lives — and that’s exactly what draws me to the Urban Tarot. I’ve been meaning to make a post about the way urban fantasy has the potential to inscribe the landscape around you with an additional layer of meaning: it’s something I tried to do in the Changeling game I ran, and it showed up in the Onyx Court books, too, which were inspired by that game. The urban fantasy novels I like often do this kind of thing, not just taking place in Generica City or the Hollywood version of San Francisco or wherever, but making use of place on a more detailed, meaningful level. It isn’t just an urban fantasy thing — it isn’t even a new thing; Keith Basso’s Wisdom Sits in Places talks about the link between Western Apache folklore and the landscape around their communities — but it works especially well there because the world the story describes is ours, or at least closely adjacent enough to ours that we can feel the resonance.

The Urban Tarot does this beautifully. It ties the cards in with the landscape and the people and events of New York City — the public library, Coney Island, the Brooklyn Bridge during Hurricane Sandy — and it pushes back against the idea that cities aren’t magic, that the kind of meaning we read into the world around us back when that world was rural can’t be retained in the modern day. It rethinks the old archetypes of the tarot into a context you and I can recognize: the Empress is feeding a baby in a high chair, the Eight of Wands shows a cyclist delivering a pizza, the Prince of Swords is a hacker. Even if you don’t have any interest in the tarot as such, you could do worse than to feed your urban fantasy brain with these cards and their associated writeups.

Card image of The Princess of Swords, by Robin Scott

And the artwork is, in my opinion, gorgeous. Each card is built out of a kind of textural collage, abstracting the image without losing its recognizable form. I have the Princess of Swords (aka The Activist) on my wall. I liked the art enough that when I backed the Kickstarter, I chose to go for the level where I could model for one of the cards — no, I’m not telling you which; you’ll have to find out for yourself. 😉 Robin and I struck a deal wherein I wrote a piece of flash fiction for the guidebook, riffing off a location in the city she wasn’t able to work into the deck; that’s how much I wanted to support this project.

You can buy the Urban Tarot itself, or prints of any of the cards. I strongly encourage you all to at least go take a look, and appreciate what Robin has put together.

Originally published at Swan Tower. You can comment here or there.

Friday, September 30th, 2016 06:36 pm
The Romans (apocryphally, at least) shared a its researcher with Carry On Cleo. I'm not sure if this is true, I doubt that Doctor Who had the budget for a researcher. But there is definitely something "Carry On" in the DNA of this tale of intrigue and shenanigans in ancient Rome.

More under the Cut )

In the end, I felt most of The Romans was a miss. Comedy is difficult to do well, and even harder to pull off when you want an element of genuine peril in your story. Doctor Who in the 1960s had neither the rehearsal time nor, I suspect, the expertise to pull this off. However, as a story, it has its moments of genuine charm and gives us a view of the Tardis crew we rarely get elsewhere.
Friday, September 30th, 2016 12:21 pm
Friday morning afternoon miscellany:

= Recs update:
[personal profile] unfitforsociety has been updated for September 2016 with 24 recs in 7 fandoms:

* 12 Star Wars
* 4 Avengers
* 2 Check, Please!
* 2 Ghostbusters
* 2 Stranger Things
* 1 Harry Potter & 1 Star Trek Beyond

= Pitch: The Interim
spoilers )

= Last night, [tumblr.com profile] twistedingenue mentioned how great a Check Please!/Sports Night crossover would be, and now I would really like to see Jack's big coming out interview be with Dan Rydell. ♥DAN♥ I am just saying. Also, while I'm at it with the crossovers that should exist, surely Ginny Baker should be on Sports Night and Isaac can be all stately and mentoring in public and secretly fannish about her. ♥ISAAC♥

= LUKE CAGE TONIGHT. I AM EXCITE. GIVE IT TO ME. I was talking about it with a co-worker yesterday and she was like, "We will convene on Monday to discuss!" so I guess I won't be parceling it out and making it last. Ah well, the weather is supposed to be chilly and rainy, so I guess that's all right.

= Speaking of fannishly inclined co-workers (though I haven't yet discerned the true nature of her fannishness beyond it existing), I thought the response was bad when I told non-internet people that I liked Jason Todd. That's nothing compared to the hilariously horrified reactions I get when I say, "You know, The Clone Wars actually made me like Anakin Skywalker." The recoiling that goes on then, and the clear marking down of my fannish intelligence, is pretty funny. Otoh, if she actually gives TCW a shot and likes it, I think we could have some fun chats. *hands*

***
Friday, September 30th, 2016 08:22 am
 to [personal profile] jonsinger !  Happy and gorgeous and fabulous day, with excellent dinner (and lunch and breakfast.  Why not?)!

(And let us not forget les jumelles!  Bonne anniversaire, mesdemoiselles!)
Tags:
Friday, September 30th, 2016 03:16 pm

Posted by JenniferP

Hello, it’s about 10:00 am on Friday in Chicago. From now until noon, I’m going to answer as many short Twitter questions as I can under the hashtag #awkwardchat. Patreon patrons can also submit questions to the post comments there. Turning off comments here until the chat is over to limit confusion (and # of characters/words).

Let’s do this!

“What do I tell myself when I have to memorize, for an exam, things that have proven to be inaccurate or false?” 

Howabout: “Once I make it through this class I will devote my life to setting the record straight. Now, my white-hot anger shall be my memory aid.

Depression, anxiety, and lingering grief and anger from a bad breakup are wearing on me, but I still need to Get Shit Done(tm). How do I approach doing that without ignoring how I am feeling? 

Give yourself permission to grieve for a short time each day. Maybe set a timer for 20 minutes and free-write in a journal in the morning  so that you can indulge the yucky feelings and get them out on the page. When the timer goes off, make a choice to put that aside and focus on the things you need to do. The journal will be there later, or tomorrow, when you need it. If you can make a ritual like this where you have permission to feel your feelings, you might also be able to give yourself permission to put it aside when you need to get things done. When that fails, I’ve heard the Bene Gesserit Litany Against Fear is pretty good.

I’m working through a poly/metamour communication issue. Any tips on balancing different personalities and needs? Also, I’m an “everyone needs to like me gal,” and I often put that in front of whether or not I actually *want* to be friends with this person. The answer to your question is in your question: You’re considerate of other people’s needs, sometimes at the expense of your own. You’re probably a fantastic partner and really good at the negotiations of poly life as long as everything is going your way. What if for the next little while you tried an experiment, where you gently/kindly state your own preferences and let other people do some of the work of balancing? “I don’t want to hang out this weekend.” “I like our friendship just how it is.” “I’m glad you and (Partner) are having fun, that’s great! I don’t want to join your hangouts/hang out with you one-on-one.” “I prefer waffles to pancakes.” 

How does one combine introvert and a very extrovert job (e.g. teaching) without feeling exhausted all the time? Dude. I wish I knew.

Ok, that’s not true, I *know* some ways, I don’t always *do* those ways.

Some strategies:

  • Remember to eat & drink – regular meals, bring a snack, drink water, plan to refuel.
  • Get up early on class days and use that time to prepare/wake up all the way.
  • Use the class breaks to get *away* for 10 minutes. Sometimes I go to the bathroom on a different floor so I can have a few minutes free of interaction.
  • Track energy levels and look for patterns. It’s okay to plan something social for right after teaching – when I’m on and in that mode, I’ll stay on for a while. I will need some downtime the next day, though, so, plan for that if possible.
  • Schedule blocks of time when I look at email/work with students.
  • Simplify other stuff I have to do that day as much as possible.
  • Have lots of teaching strategies on hand – get students working in small groups, get students presenting & sharing clips, get students moderating discussions & their own critique sessions, to give my voice/energy some built-in breaks.

Do you ever regret starting an advice column?

Rarely, if ever. Sometimes I regret that it took me off the road of making movies for a good while, but I love the work and the community. If I could do this as my main job, I probably would.

Ever regret answering a question?

Yes, a few. That one from the anxious guy, which I won’t link to, but if you remember it, you know exactly what it is. A few where I fucked up the advice, missed something really obvious, or didn’t think it through all the way. Some where the Letter Writer quickly became overwhelmed by All The Opinions of The Internet rolling in on their fragile life situation.

I’d love some Ask A Manager-style updates from letter writers. How likely is that too happen with CA?

I do get updates every now and then, some private, some with permission to post, but I never want letter writers to feel obligated to update us. I like Ask A Manager’s updates, too, and I know the woman who wasn’t allowed to pee haunts us all to this day. If you’re reading, we love you and hope you are okay. This sounds like a good January project, though. I’ll see what I can pull together.

HOW IS YOUR CAT SO CUTE? ARE YOU WILLING TO SELL? HOW MUCH $$$?

Her cuteness is a mystery – if only it came as a serum we could spray on not-cute things to make them cuter! As tempting as cash offer is, she is wrapped around my head like a tiny hat right now and winter is coming.

How do I overcome Resting Friendly Face?

I share your curse. Headphones. Always having a book with me. Helping people when I can, saying (while probably still smiling), “Forgive me but I have no idea! Good luck!” when I can’t. Basically, I can’t overcome it, so I try to live with it and then write a website about boundaries.

I’m going to be out of work to donate a kidney. I don’t have to tell my coworkers why. Pros/cons of telling?

I don’t have pros and cons, just questions.

  • Do you like your coworkers?
  • How gossipy are they? Do you think they are speculating about why you’re out of the office and coming up with weird reasons for it?
  • Would you tell them if you were having another kind of surgery, like, “I broke my foot, need surgery”?
  • Are any of them doing a giant favor by covering for you?
  • Are you going to need any kind of specific help or recovery time when you come back?
  • You sound like a person who is pretty private and who doesn’t a big deal made about you, which seems like a good reason not to tell. Maybe hold off on the specifics until after the fact.